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Hello I'm Francine, I'm a 17 year old female from Surrey, UK and I think that the glass is always half empty. This blog consists mainly of Owl City and Adam Young in general, LIGHTS, Merlin, Sherlock, Press Gang, Lord of the Rings and Cats.

i guess the real question is how can you not like tesla

he thought women would eventually rule the world because we’re the dominant sex

he liked pigeons

he was a vegetarian 

he was a babe

he was shy

he hated edison 

he’s perfect 

image

Yup, as long as you’re ok with that time he went bonkers and tried to build a death ray.

Are you serious the death ray was the best part

quinngingerlove:

archicide:

"we almost dated" is such a weird relationship to have with someone

Plus the sequel “we never got closure”

And then the side adaptation “as a result I have a weird crush that never died”

Merle Dandridge (Marlene): The focus on female strength [in this game] is so unique. You get to see what’s so powerful about a woman through all of these female characters, which makes this game wonderful and unique.

Ashley Johnson (Ellie): I do think having a strong female character, especially like Ellie, is so rare in video games. And as a gamer - more specifically a female gamer - it’s frustrating to me because I’ll see sort of the stereotypical female character, where she’s amazingly beautiful, and [has] huge boobs. And she’s there to be, either the love interest, or just because they’re like, “Well, we need to throw a chick in here.” To sort of be such a strong female character that is completely normal looking - regular t-shirt and jeans, and she’s fourteen, and she’s still a total badass - it’s really exciting to be a part of that.

Troy Baker (Joel): We’ve seen the strong woman, or we’ve seen the weak woman. We haven’t necessarily seen the empowered woman from this kind of standpoint. And there’s that beautiful scene where Joel finds her inside the house and she’s reading through this girl’s journal, like, “Is this really what they used to worry about?” What shirt do I wear and what boy am I gonna go out with. Y’know, and to be met with those first world problems that we deal with everyday. [You have to ask yourself] how trivial is all this?  I think [the game] is gonna resonate a lot, not just with the female audience, but with the male audience as well. 

Neil Druckmann (Creative Director): There are so few non-sexualized women in video games, especially in the main roles, that we were kinda proud that we were creating one who’s very complex. And without the players knowing it, she becomes the protagonist by the end of the story.

Neil Druckmann & cast on the theme of female empowerment in The Last of Us

okidenshi:

TLOU fandom back in summer of 2013: Stop saying how much Ellie looks like Ellen Page

TLOU fandom now: Ellen Page should play Ellie in the movie.

Ellie, heroine of popular video game, is headed for the big screen »

geek-studio:

“The Last of Us” is going to the big screen.
Deadline Hollywood reports that Sony’s Screen Gems production company will distribute the film adaptation of the the wildly popular PlayStation 3 game developed by Naughty Dog, creators of the “Uncharted” series. Neil Druckman, the game’s creative director, will write the script.
Creators of the post-apocalyptic game have cited multiple inspirations, including ”The Road,” and “No Country for Old Men” the film adaptations of two Cormac McCarthy novels. The main characters, Joel and Ellie, are left to navigate a world that’s been ravaged by a fungus that’s turning people into zombies. It’s a hit thanks to its complex story line and stunning graphics, and was rated one of the best games of the year by Metacritic and IGN.
This could be promising on multiple feminist fronts.
The game has attracted attention for its strong female character, Ellie. She’s a precocious teenager who’s modern and multi-faceted. The game even explores themes of female friendship: Naughty Dog’s latest downloadable chapter focuses on Ellie’s relationship with her best friend, Riley.
Anita Sarkeesian of Feminist Frequency has published multiple videos explaining sexist tropes in video games, such as the damsel in distress, or the Ms. Male character.
Plus, there aren’t many female-driven story lines in Hollywood movies these days as Cate Blanchett and Meryl Streep noted recently. A movie version of “The Last of Us” means a highly-visible and meaty role for the lucky actress who lands the part.